Campaign Ads

Scrounging through the internet, I found some interesting examples of print campaigns that were translated into a motion piece. The first one is the Bodies in motion tend to stay in motion. It’s an age-old principle that is at the heart of the adidas SLVR Spring/Summer 2013 collection inspired by martial arts, Fight Club, and the human physique. Consequently the new campaign presents the collection against a raw, make-shift backdrop. Photographed by Willy Vanderperre, the campaign depicts group compositions shot against a set in constant flux, continuing an architectural yet loose look. The imagery communicates Dirk Schönberger’s high-fashion perspective, combining precision tailoring with a sport attitude. The campaign extends this idea by presenting a fusion of seemingly opposing references like Hawaiian prints with boxing silhouettes. This clash illustrates the amalgamation of tailoring and sportswear as the core of the SLVR collection.The Spring/Summer 2013 video translates the concept into motion. Climaxing to silence, the edit uses acceleration of pace and raw distortion effects to merge the various looks into one contrasting edit.

Adidas-SLVR-Spring-Summer-2013-Campaign-+-Video-4 Here’s the video.

 

Lincoln was originally called the Lincoln Motor Company in 1922, when Edsel Ford signed the agreement purchasing the company from its founder Henry Leland. During its early years, Edsel worked with numerous custom-body suppliers to make Lincoln one of the most distinctive luxury brands in the industry, with motorcars that were urbane, sleek and elegant — the epitome of understated luxury. By reintroducing “The Lincoln Motor Company,” the campaign captures the founding principles of the company and brings them forward to a new generation of progressive luxury buyers.”Befitting this new chapter in the life of Lincoln we are making a complete new start in every aspect of consumer communication to emotionally welcome our new target customer into our brand,” said Matt VanDyke, Director of Global Lincoln Brand. “It’s not often this opportunity comes around so we intend to make the most of it and have our work in every medium be as fresh, surprising and distinctive as the new Lincoln vehicles and customer experiences will be.”The new campaign features the all-new MKZ premium midsize sedan and MKZ Hybrid, the first transformational vehicles for the new Lincoln brand. They will be arriving in dealerships by the end of the month.The Introducing the Lincoln Motor Company theme will be carried across print, broadcast, digital media and Lincoln’s own online platforms starting Dec. 3. The first print ads will break in major national newspapers and online media on Dec. 3 as well. National print ads will appear in January 2013 issues of select business and consumer lifestyle magazines.

New Print Advertising
The newspaper print announcement features two all-type treatments. The first begins with the provocation, “Does the World Need Another Luxury Car?” debuting on Dec. 3, followed by “Hello. Again” debuting on Dec. 10. Both emphasize the values that once made Lincoln the leader in luxury automobiles and how these same values will be the key to its future development. These ads feature no images. A white, minimalist page with black typeface emphasizes simplicity in design.The magazine print campaign offers an introduction to the brand and its focus on individuality. Each ad features a group of people who, at first glance, could easily be categorized, but who Lincoln recognizes as unique individuals in their own right. This campaign launches the all-new Lincoln MKZ midsize premium sedan.

2014-Lincoln-MKX-and-Lexus-ES-screen-grab-03-796x528Here’s the video ad.

 

 

 

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